What is Digital Scrapbooking?

** This is an older post.  Some of the links are out of date.  I recently found this article on a a different website which explains some of this with more current links. 🙂


Most people have seen traditional photo albums, which are usually just pages and pages of photos and nothing else… well, maybe a note here or there explaining who is in the photos. Traditional scrapbooking takes that a step further by using thematic or otherwise artistic paper. Then the photos are placed amongst stickers, more paper, embellishments such as gems, flowers, ribbons, tape, etc.

This is great, and the dimensionality of the pages is wonderful for those who like the feel of “things” in their hands.

But for those of us who aren’t so tactile… and who live in tiny homes with rambunctious children wreaking havoc 24/7, all those supplies are a hassle. Stacks of paper, boxes of embellishments, folders full of stickers… it’s the stuff of nightmares!

That’s why I turned digital. When my daughter was a baby, I wanted to scrapbook her to bits. And I did! But as she grew bigger, she wanted to help. This was NOT helpful, despite the cuteness factor. I found stickers stuck to things that shouldn’t be stickered. I found ribbons tied to things that shouldn’t be ribboned. I found fancy papers with crayon scribbles. Obviously, this was not going to work.

Enter digital scrapbooking!

The most important thing to do is pick software. Oh, so many options! There are several different computer programs you can use that are designed specially for scrapbooking, such as MyMemories Suite, and Scrapbook Max. The most popular software seems to be Photoshop Elements, Photoshop (extremely expensive, and professional grade, and I use an extremely old version of this one most often), or Paint Shop Pro (I use a very, very old version of this one, as well). Your choice of software does have an effect on what you can do with your pages, but once you’ve learned the software, you can probably do just about anything.

There are so many different ways you can scrap digitally, and they can’t all be easily explained. There are as many styles as there are scrappers! My style, for example, is pretty simple. I like to use mostly paper, with just a few embellishments like flowers and ribbon. Others like to fill a page with so many elements that you can’t even see the photos. Some scrappers are more into creating artistic pages that are barely about scrapping, but more about creating art. All of these types are great, but you have to know what you want to do with your pages, in order to get the proper supplies and use them the right away.

One of the easiest ways to figure out what you like is to peruse the galleries that are out there. Many are attached to stores, such as the one at Plain Digital Wrapper, but there are also open galleries such as DigishopTalk, and there’s also ScrapStacks, which is like a Pinterest for scrappers. And of course, Pinterest is there as well, you just have to know what to search for.

Then, once you’ve figured out your style, you’ve got to find the supplies that cry out to you, “use me! use me!” That’s the hardest part of digiscrapping.

There are literally thousands of designers out there in the digi world right now. There are well known, highly established stores. There are stores that pop up overnight and disappear almost as quickly. There are designers selling on Ebay and on Etsy. Honestly, I don’t do much shopping anymore since I mostly use my own designs, but I get newsletters from dozens of stores and designers. Facebook is a wonderful place to find and keep up with designers – most have pages (like mine!), and many of them have freebies on those pages.

Good luck choosing your software, your style, and your favorite places to shop. Of course I hope you’ll choose my designs, but even if you don’t, digiscrapping is a wonderful hobby and well worth the investment in time, money, and supplies. If you have questions please feel free to send me a message here, via Facebook, or email!